In late 19th century education programs were instituted to separate first nation children from their traditional way of life. The missionaries and the government expected to transform indigenous children into better Canadians and Christian values required to separate the students from their first nation culture. (Kenneth Coates, pg.no.28) The government runs boarding schools to make children productive citizens by offering intellectual and technical skills. These schools strictly pressurized to the children to speak only English language. In addition, the residential school system engaged in the forced transfer of Indigenous children through the education but with the goal of assimilation and alteration.
In Yukon, residential and day schools were long term impacts on first nation people. In 1891, the first day school was established in Carcross at 40 mile, under residential school system. There were five residential schools which established in Yukon Territory; the Chooutla Indian residential school, the Aklavik Anglican Indian Residential School, the Baptist Indian Residential School, the St. Paul’s Indian Residential School and .
Chooutla Indian residential school: It was established in Carcross by 1911 and was managed by Anglican Church. All the staff and other responsibilities of children care and maintenance was provided by the Church. Furthermore, the school was per capita funded by the Government. It was closed in 1969.
Aklavik Anglican Residential School: It was operated in 1927 at shingle point. In 1934 due to overcrowding this school was moved to Aklavik..
Baptist residential School: this school was established in Whitehorse in 1940. This school was financially supported by the Indian Affairs Branch.
St. Paul’s Indian Residential School: was opened in 1920 in Dawson city. The school was closed by 1943 and after that the school building was transformed into St. Paul’s Hostel.